Category: Culture

 

Camargo Pharmaceutical Services: Valuing Employees from the Get-Go


At Camargo Pharmaceutical Services, Erica Forrest and Stacy Schnieber have carefully cultivated a workplace culture in which a positive employee experience drives subsequent HR goals. In this edition of Core Shines a Light, we’re sharing a rundown of Camargo’s best practices.

Nurturing relationships with new hires: “We’re here and we care”

Camargo implements a 90-day onboarding strategy to engage new employees as they transition into the company. They’ve designed this strategy with a keen focus on the following attributes:

  • Relationship-building, identifying sources of motivation and expressing appreciation
  • Optimizing their HRIS system to streamline the employee experience and avoid disjointed and confusing paperwork
  • Creating checkpoints at two-week, sixty day and ninety day intervals to gauge progress, address concerns and give feedback

Camargo team members Andrea and Erica

The first two weeks at Camargo begin with honing in on customizing the employee experience with ‘get to know’ meetings/coffee breaks and networking opportunities with members from Senior Leadership (lunches and informal chat sessions.)

At sixty days, goals are set for the following quarter, to-date challenges are discussed and competency assessments are employed in order to identify ways to leverage employee strengths and areas of opportunity. Camargo has found that this gives direction and builds personalized strategies for achieving objectives.

At ninety days new employees benefit from an extended meeting with their manager, complete an employee onboarding experience survey with suggestions strongly encouraged.

Camargo knows that the path to success doesn’t end with recruitment and onboarding. Their continued efforts to fuel an engaged and productive workforce is evident in their strategies for nurturing ongoing relationships, such as:

Fostering positivity and productivity by understanding the importance of employee satisfaction through:

  • Wellness initiatives: fresh fruit provided, lunch & learns, flu shot clinic, mini-massages
  • Employee celebration for birthdays and achievements
  • Opportunities for ongoing feedback on a quarterly basis
  • Ongoing professional training and development

Finally, Camargo follows the onboarding process with a continual commitment to engage employees via:

  • Weekly all-employee, company-provided lunches
  • Philanthropic events (community 5K, Adopt-A-Family)
  • Regular team-building events and activities at local venues (the Camargo team strives to support small businesses in their local community. They support Pipkins for weekly fruit, holiday gifts from Benchmark and facilitate team building at Houdini’s Escape Room in Montgomery

We hope you’ve been inspired with the openness and commitment to team from our friends at Camargo! Their ongoing efforts to exercise effective HR practices while reflecting company values illustrate that their team really does walk the talk by recognizing that “your people are your core.”

Keep up the great work, Camargo!

Core Shines a Light is a periodic spotlight on Human Resources best practices in the Greater Cincinnati area. Interested in sharing your workplace’s best practices? We’d love to hear from you! Contact Amy Clark at amy.clark@contact-core.com.

Stop to smell the roses (literally)

We all get caught up in today’s pace. It’s a constant hustle and bustle. In many ways, this pace has brought about advantages for our companies. We’re pushing boundaries, innovating new and better ways of doing things, producing to higher standards. However, there are also clearly some drawbacks. Unfortunately many of these drawbacks are people-oriented: burn out and inattention to personal wellness, toxic relationships, and decisions often made without regard to the employees who execute your strategy.

RecognitionI’m writing this post as a reminder to myself and others to stop and smell the roses. We had a client last week do just that. After a multi-month project to digitize files, this rockstar team completed the final one. Was this the “sexiest,” most meaningful, or greatest thrill of a project? No, but it had to get done for the efficiency of their operations and the ultimate value they provide their clients.

It would have been so easy for them to check it off the list and move on (our lists are long, and there are always more deadlines looming!). Lucky for them, their CEO knew the importance of pausing for recognition and celebration. He surprised them with flowers and chocolates, and they recognized the achievement as a team during their morning huddle. Spirits were full and positive that day in the office (and I don’t think you have to be an I/O Psychologist to understand what that does to engagement and performance).

Moral of the story: I err on the side of idealism and tend to believe that we have the best of intentions, but unfortunately those intentions are often negated with the pace of our day. So let’s slow down when needed. Take a pause. Our workplaces are full of human beings – human beings with the need for connectedness, for appreciation, and for fulfillment with the hours they put in at work. And in fact, our business results are nothing (NOTHING!) without the hard work of the human beings who achieve them for us. So let’s not forget this.

Why Feelings Matter at Work: Being Intentional About Employee Experience

Employee Experience Blog popcorn1I like my V8 V-Fusion® + Energy pomegranate drink around 2:00 p.m. in my Bengals tumbler with ice (crushed, not cubed), with some Smart Pop on the side. It’s just what I need to plow through what would otherwise be drowsy afternoon hours and get some serious work done.

It makes me feel creative.

It makes me feel confident about the work I’m producing.

It makes me feel happy (…and sometimes feeling “happy” goes a long way).

At initial glance, it appears to just be some liquid, a cup, and a few kernels. But no – it’s so much more. It’s an EXPERIENCE, and an experience that actually alters my behaviors, attitude and output.

I’m sure everyone can think of a similar experience that makes you feel a certain way – maybe it’s that first sip of coffee in the morning, that brand new “A Game” outfit you put on to knock your sales presentation out of the park, or maybe it’s the tranquility of your favorite cocktail glass in front of the fire at the end of a long day.

Consumer Experience

We invest a lot into the experience consumers have with our products and services. There are entire marketing strategies designed around it, product and brand managers focused on it every single day (and whose bonus depends on it!), and researchers continuously testing to measure effectiveness and resulting consumer behavior.

Why? Because the way something makes us feel alters our behaviors, attitude and output. This includes decisions we make about the products and services we choose to engage with.

Employee Experience

Let’s switch gears now and think about the employee experience inside your organization’s four walls (or multitude of continents, or virtual platforms, or in whatever form your organization exists). What have you invested internally to support a positive employee experience? Have you developed a strategy (what kind of experience do you want them to have in the first place)? Do you have a team and budget to execute on the strategy? Who are your “researchers” and what continuous metrics do you have in place?

Being intentional about proactively creating the experience your employees have while working for you will result in the behaviors, attitudes and output you desire from your team. After all, our employees – just like our consumers – are human. The way they feel at any moment in time affects their behavior.

So how can you make sure they’re feeling the way you want them to? Follow these five steps:

1. Identify how you want your employees to feel at work. Every organization is different, so define what’s right for you based on the needs of your business strategy.

2. Audit current versus desired feelings to identify where there are gaps (this can be done a number of ways – via survey, focus groups, observations, interviews, etc.).

3. Develop a plan to create an employee experience that yields the desired feelings you’ve identified in Step 1, now being informed of the gaps via Step 2. Consider elements such as:

  • Physical office environment (colors, work spaces, lighting, wall hangings, furniture, etc.)
  • Management and leadership – what “type” of leaders are you acquiring and building in order to support this experience? (Watch this video to learn more about the vital role organizational leaders play in creating the “smell of the place.”)
  • Opportunities to connect/collaborate (both professionally and socially)
  • Levels of autonomy and empowerment to make decisions
  • Core values and how they’re brought to life during your daily operations
  • Flexibility in how work gets done
  • Continuous learning and professional development

4. Identify the resources (material, people, and financial) needed to support the plan.

5. Execute the plan, measure regularly, and tweak as needed.

Be Intentional

Don’t just let the experience “happen.” Just like you do with your customers, be intentional about creating the type of employee experience that is going to foster high levels of engagement, collaboration, innovation, loyalty, and ultimately performance and results. Otherwise, you can throw your best consumer experience strategy out the window! It starts at home.

5 Ways to Ensure Employees Deliver your Brand Promise

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A few weeks ago I facilitated a team offsite for a client I’m working with on an engagement project. The location was this really cool art studio in a trendy part of town. As I pulled into the lot, I quickly noticed that the owners must value “green.” There were some vegetated swales and designated parking spots for fuel efficient and “HOV” vehicle parking.  I was instantly lured in and appreciated the respect shown toward the business’ environmental impact…before even stepping foot in the door.

I wasn’t sure what HOV stood for, so it was the first question I asked the young man working in the reception area. His response – “I really don’t know. People ask me that all the time.”

Brand disconnect.

Hmmm….I thought. Was this all for show? Was it the trendy thing to do? Are they just trying to keep up with competition?

About a week later I did some research on their website. It ends up it’s a LEED Silver Certified green building. The rooftop has a solar panel system, and their property features a monarch butterfly conservation waystation, a bioswale rain garden, and a garden of native plants and prairie grasses. Being married to an environmental scientist and having worked in an environmental industry, I know that this level of commitment to green takes an investment, not to mention motivation and passion.

So this was clearly an internal brand alignment issue, which resulted in my brand experience being compromised. I cared enough to do further research on my own, but I’m part of probably 1% who would. Most customers would have stopped with thinking, “This place is just trying to be trendy but has no idea what being green even means” and potentially take their business elsewhere due to a feeling of fakeness during their experience.

Even if it was a false perception of the brand due to this one comment made by the receptionist, we all know very well that perception is reality.

Two important takeaways from this story:

  1. Your employees ARE your brand.
  2. Your employees can make or break your customers’ brand experience.

How many employees are aligned with their organization’s brand?

When asked how much they agree with the following statement, “I know what my company stands for and what makes our brand(s) different from our competitors,” 2012 research conducted by Gallup found that only:

  • 60% of executives strongly agreed
  • 46% of managers strongly agreed
  • 37% of all other employees strongly agreed

Maybe even more concerning is that 9% of other employees (non-executive, non-manager) strongly disagreed that they understand their company’s brand promise and brand differentiation.

Why is this more concerning? Because it’s typically your frontline that has the most touchpoints with your customers. It’s the receptionist greeting customers as they walk in, the customer service rep answering your customers’ calls, the entry-level sales associate running a Lunch & Learn webinar about your products and services.

What can I do to align my employees with my brand?

1. Answer: What is it?

First thing first – develop a brand strategy if you haven’t already. Be intentional about what you want your brand to feel like, look like, be differentiated by, etc. Include the following in your brand strategy:

  • Brand platform/positioning
  • Brand personality
  • Brand naming and architecture
  • Brand experience
  • Brand imagery
  • Brand alignment plan (!!!)

2. Embed it consistently into your internal communications.

Plot out your internal channels, create messaging around the brand, and insert it frequently and indefinitely into every employee touchpoint.

3. Reward and recognize brand-aligned behaviors.

Create recognition schemes that positively promote brand-boosting behavior.  This could range anywhere from public “shout outs” to performance-driven compensation plans. Are your employees living your brand? Reward them for it!

4. Onboard every single new employee around the brand.

Even seasonals and temps if they are going to be interacting with your customers. It is highly likely that the young man at the art studio who didn’t know what HOV stood for was a summer temp. Have employees “drink the Kool-Aid” from Day 1 by not focusing solely on policies, forms, and medical benefits, but also on your brand promise. Have them “feel” it first-hand through experiential learning embedded into your onobaridng program.

5. Regularly solicit input from employees about the brand.

Where are they feeling a disconnect? What aspects of it do they feel the closest connections to and why? What are their clients saying? Make it an ongoing discussion, and address needs and/or make changes as warranted.

Oh, and just in case this has been eating at you since you started reading – HOV stands for High Occupancy Vehicle. 🙂

The Bears vs. The Bengals: Tackle Engagement Head-On

Let me set the scene. 90 degrees. Loads of humidity. Not an ounce of shade on 100 yards of turf, encircled by a dark black track. Only four players on the Bears show up for a game against the #2 team, the Bengals. Oh…and they’re all 4 and 5-year-olds.

This was my view at McNich’s athletic field in Cincinnati on Sunday as my oldest son attended his final flag football game of the season. Little did I know that I was about to witness a classic case of DISENGAGEMENT and the effects it has on TEAM PERFORMANCE.

My son loves football…lives it, breathes it, says the words Who Dey more than any other term between September and January every year.  He looks forward to his flag football game each week and always gives it his all.

This Sunday was different. A few of the players on his team were just not feelin’ it…for whatever reason (remember – they’re only 4 and 5-years-old). Ben’s smiles and excitement quickly turned to a pretty grim looking face. He was starting to let the heat of the day and the morale of the team get to him, and it was changing the type of player he decided to be on the field that day.

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Your disengaged employees will bring down your team far easier and quicker than your greatest cheerleader can ever build them up.

It’s just human nature. It’s easier for us to gravitate toward negativity. We get sucked in. That disengaged mindset can even creep over into the minds, and ultimately behaviors, of some of your most engaged employees. And it doesn’t take long. Eventually, collective team performance suffers.

The Bears lost the game against the Bengals Sunday. But it doesn’t have to end that way.

AllResponsibilityBlogI’ve written previously about how individuals can take ownership of their own engagement, and I’ve also written about what an organization can do to build an engaged workforce. There’s a third player in this mix though, and that’s the manager, or whoever is in that “team lead” role. It’s a shared responsibility amongst all three parties to build a culture of engagement in your workplace.

These tips are for that third party. What could you have done to turn that game around on Sunday and ensure a strong team performance in the end?

 

1. Identify the disengagement. Keep your eyes and ears open and know when someone on your team is disengaged. Acknowledgement is a critical first step.

2. Uncover the root cause. Identifying the disengagement only goes so far. It’s your job to understand what is causing it. You can do this through something as formal as an engagement survey or as informal as an open and transparent conversation. During this stage, make sure you seek to understand. Actively listen. Resist the temptation to jump to your own conclusions. The reason for the disengagement could span a large host of underlying causes, such as:

  • Poor job/role fit
  • A wavering trust in leadership
  • The perception of having no growth at the company
  • Not feeling recognized for their work
  • Lack of understanding of how what they do every day aligns with what the organization is trying to achieve

 FootballBlog 3. Address the root cause. Now it’s time to act. Once you identify the root cause, collaboratively build action plans around it that everyone has bought into and can own. One cause of disengagement on the football field that day was the heat. In response, we poured ice cold water over the players’ heads. Please don’t pour ice cold water on your employees, but hopefully you get my point.

4. Measure and re-assess. As with anything, monitor progress. Have check points along the way, and initiate more of that open and transparent communication about the results you’re seeing, whether positive or negative. Alter the course of action if it’s not working.

Bottom line – when you see disengagement amongst your team, tackle it head on (no pun intended!). Don’t let it fester. Your team will thank you.

Need help working through the four steps listed above? Reach out, and I’d love to help you and your team through the process.

A World With No Bosses

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That’s right…I said no bosses. Zero. Zilch. Nada.  But, oh the chaos that would ensue from all of those unsupervised children running rampant throughout your organization! (electronic tone clarification: sarcasm)

Okay, so I’m being a bit facetious with that last statement, but maybe I got your attention? I’ve been wanting to blog about this topic ever since attending the 2014 Association for Talent Development (ATD) International Conference & Expo in Washington, D.C. last month.   I had the pleasure of attending a learning session titled, “Skills for Driving Innovation in Flat Organizations” given by Dr. Debra France (@fstinno) with W.L. Gore & Associates.  Since its founding in 1958, W.L. Gore has operated using what they call a “lattice” structure, a model where relationships are everything and hierarchies and even titles are minimal, nearly non-existent.  They have been featured in many innovation and management-related business articles and research studies over the years, as I’m sure many of you are aware.

Structure

There are three main roles at W.L. Gore:

  1. Sponsors: Every single employee has one. Their purpose is to create micro-environments for innovators by coaching, mentoring, guaranteeing continued development, and supporting ideas. These are volunteer roles, and everyone chooses their own Sponsor by just simply asking. You can “break up” the relationship at any time, for any number of reasons. Some people might be Sponsors to 2-10 at a time, depending on how many they are willing to take on. Some, on the other hand, might not be a Sponsor to anyone at all (which is usually not a good sign).
  2. Team Leaders: The people in these roles are identified/elected by the team. Specific responsibilities are provided in detail in the Support section below.
  3. Associates: This comprises the large majority of the organization, as it is every other role that is not a Team Leader.

Note: You can be both a Sponsor and a Leader, or you could also be a Sponsor and an Associate.

As stated on their website, the lattice structure creates a culture described as “a team-based environment that encourages personal initiative and person-to-person communication among all associates.”  Employees are expected to grow and continuously nurture their lattice from Day 1.

At the core of this structure are several small and agile teams, which form naturally around business needs and opportunities. Everyone on the team holds each another accountable, to the point of stack ranking their teammates on both the Impact and Effectiveness of their contributions to the larger enterprise. Employees develop their own “commitments” (equivalent to performance objectives); and projects, tasks and ideas advance through influence and consensus, not authority.

Support

Centrally-supported employee development efforts are heavily focused on communication and how to facilitate and grow strong relationships. I’ve already mentioned the support Associates get from their Sponsors, so let’s take a look at what the role of Leaders is at W.L. Gore and how they support the team.

Note: An overarching belief at W.L. Gore is that there is the need for a “Leader” role with specific and differentiated responsibilities, but yet the act of “Leadership” is expected of all.

The Role of a Leader in a Bossless Organization

Direction (strategies, priorities, decisions) – Make sure decisions are made and made well…but by the team.

Expectations – Is the environment healthy and productive? Is the team aligned with the broader enterprise? What metrics are being used to measure success?

People – Provide motivation, development and resources for the team (in conjunction with Sponsors)

Interfaces – Foster interdependencies across, beyond, and between the entire enterprise to create value. Ensure the team is interfacing with other teams.

No Easy Feat – Start Small

Dr. France readily admitted that this has been an easier road for them than maybe others because they’ve known no other road. Life at W.L. Gore has been like this since the very beginning. For companies interested in exploring this structure further that are already larger than 10 employees, she advised that you start with something small in a functional area or with a project in which you think it could work well, and then monitor and measure success.

Is There Something To This?

I have to believe that W.L. Gore is doing something right – they have been included on all Fortune 100 “Best Companies to Work For” lists since 1998 and have thrived as a business over the course of time. Although not new to them, this structure is becoming an increasingly popular practice in today’s business world, with Zappos being one of the most recent companies to gain media attention around their decision to go bossless.

So even if you don’t make the leap to strip away all management titles at your company, what can we learn and apply from organizations like W.L. Gore? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Special thanks to Dr. Debra France for sharing W.L. Gore’s story with us and sparking conversation and ideation around this concept!

photo credit: rossjamesparker via photopin cc

5 Lessons Business Leaders Can Learn From High Schoolers [Video]

What can business leaders learn from this 5 minute high school spirit video? A Lot!!!

Lakewood High School Lip Dub 2013 – Roar from Lakewood High School on Vimeo.

Lessons learned:

  • Team spirit leads to school spirit (i.e., engage at the functional/team level and advocacy for the broader organization will naturally follow). Students proudly displayed their unique Senate, Soccer, Tennis, Bridge, and Drama swag, but in unison for the greater good of the entire school and community.
  • Encourage affinity groups to convene. People like to connect with other people who have similar values, experiences, and interests. What are you doing to enable these connections at your organization? One of Maslow’s needs is Social/Belonging – it’s a human need that must be met before esteem and self-actualization can be reached. And HUMANS work for you, not ROBOTS.
  • Your employees have a life outside of work (crazy, I know!). Did you notice a few parents and younger children in the video? Do you host open houses or other family-friendly events at your workplace? Your employees will likely be proud to share some of their 9-5 with the other half of their life.  It will allow them to be more authentic in the workplace if they’ve shared the personal side of their lives with their teammates. Plus, you’ll only be gaining more ambassadors for your company!
  • Engagement doesn’t happen without leadership.  Someone had to “let” this happen. Students likely came to the “powers that be” with an idea, and luckily they listened, sought to understand, were open to trying new things, and were okay with taking a risk.
  • It’s okay to let loose, have a little fun, and let your unique personality shine through.  Be authentic and don’t be afraid of what other people will think (you might just be a male swimmer with a closet desire to shake your booty in your speedo on camera!). On a more serious note, let your guard down every now and then around your team and just be yourself.

And yes, these are the types of things that run through my head while watching clips like this – just trying to keep it real! Anything to add? Please share!