Category: Management

 

70:20:10 – A Model for Organizational & Lifelong Learning

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You know those handy people who can do just about anything like repair a leaky faucet or hang wall décor without it looking like the Leaning Tower of Pisa? If you’ve ever asked these “chosen ones” how they learned all that random stuff, their response was probably something extremely anti-climactic like, “I don’t know…I just know how.”

Since that response is not helpful, let’s dive into a more analytical explanation for them – a theory known as the 70:20:10 Model for Learning and Development (which all of you L&D folks reading this post know plenty about). Typically credited to originating from the Center for Creative Leadership and having been around for more than five decades, this familiar model for workplace learning is also useful to understanding how we learn just about anything in our lives. It states that we learn:

  • 70% of what we know through hands-on experience and practice;
  • 20% of what we know through other people (colleagues, bosses, mentors, social networks, etc.); and
  • 10% of what we know through formal learning (classroom instruction, books, etc.).

At a networking event this past week, I was taken a little off guard when someone randomly asked how I learned my trade. My first instinct was to respond with the same anti-climactic response I mentioned above, “I don’t know. I just know what I know.” After all, how often do we stop to think about how we know the things we apply in our personal and professional lives day after day?

After a brief pause though, I responded with, “Experiences and mentors.” It rolled off my tongue rather quickly, but it was so true. I’ve been fortunate to work on several diverse and dynamic projects and project teams throughout my career.  I’ve also served on volunteer boards, taught courses at universities, and contributed to community programs and events. I’ve likewise been incredibly fortunate to have been both supported and challenged by mentors all along the way. Yes, I have the undergraduate and graduate degrees, and yes I’ve had formalized training…however, it’s the experiences and relationships that have taken that foundational classroom theory and instruction and turned it into a fruitful career.

Check out the brief 4-minute video below where Charles Jennings, Managing Director of Duntroon Associates in the UK, shares some of the research and applicability of the 70:20:10 theory and what it means for organizational learning.

As you watch this video, I challenge you to think of the following:

  • In what areas do you wish to grow? What does your individualized learning plan look like? Make sure you’re thinking beyond the typical register for this training or attend this conference, to things like what experiences can I position myself to gain; what people can I surround myself with; what social networks can I connect with?
  • If you lead a team, organization, or L&D function, ask yourself…How can I align growth opportunities for my team to this 70:20:10 model? What does the environment need to look like? What resources could I share? What connections can I make? What questions can I ask?
  • If you lead trainings, workshops, and other structured learning events, ask yourself…How can I incorporate “real”, hands-on learning into the session? How can I get participants to engage with each other and learn from one another? What post-learning event experiences could help participants immediately apply the classroom instruction?

Need help designing a learning strategy for your workforce? I’d love to partner with you. Just fill out the Contact Form, or connect with me on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Enjoy the video and Happy Learning!

photo credit: Neil. Moralee via

Live What You Love in 2014

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How do each of you begin a new year? A valued colleague of mine, Erin Schreyer, suggests that you pick a “word of the year” that sets a tone and keeps you focused. This is great advice, and if I wasn’t so long-winded (working on it…), I’d be able to do just that. Instead, I’ve chosen four:

Live what you love.

Why? Because we only get one chance at this life thing. In 2014 (and beyond), I want to stay focused on spending my time – both personally and professionally – on the things I love. I’m thinking this might sound like a desirable feat to some of you as well, so let’s dig in.

A Personal Perspective

2014 will be a year of change for me as I officially “open shop” on my organizational development consulting practice – Core. I’m excited for the opportunities this new venture will bring to my life. It’s going to help me live what I love. How?

I LOVE… enhancing employees’ workplace experience and helping organizations thrive through engaging and empowering people practices. This is my passion, hands down. I am now able to experience a greater breadth of projects and interactions outside of just one company. I’m blessed to be kicking off my 1st quarter in business with three outstanding clients – two former employers who are near and dear, and one new partner who I’m excited to learn more about.

I LOVE…my family. As an independent consultant, outside of my client obligations, my time is mine. My children need their parents to be strong, positive, and active forces in their lives. I need the flexibility to be there for them when they need me.

I LOVE…giving back to the profession that I get so much fulfillment from. I serve on the boards of Authentic Leadership Cincinnati and the Greater Cincinnati Human Resources Association (GCHRA).  I’m looking forward to dedicating more focused attention to both groups, whose missions I very much believe in.

I LOVE…spending time with students. I’m a part-time Adjunct Instructor at the University of Cincinnati’s Blue Ash campus. It’s an outlet for me.  I learn and grow so much from just 3 hours each week with my students who are achieving dreams through education.

I LOVE…healthy living. I value a healthy lifestyle – both physically and mentally – so that I can bring my whole self to everything listed above. This new career path will allow me to eat healthier meals at home and squeeze in my runs during random “break points” during the day…no one will know if I sit back down at my desk full of sweat! 🙂

To be able to balance all of the things I love the most, independent consulting was the right track for me to pursue. I realize, however, that venturing off on your own is not for everyone. So lately I’ve been thinking about how others, within a more traditional organization, can live what they love and how managers can help their employees get there. Below are some tips I hope you find helpful.

How can you live what you love in 2014?

Identify what you love.

You might have some self-exploration to do. Start drafting a list. What do you love and how do you want to spend your time? This might be harder than it sounds.

Talk to people about it.

Once you figure it out, share it with the world! The more you talk about it, the more you’ll encourage yourself to spend your time doing those things – even if it means enduring uncomfortable change to get there. Seek out mentors, learn from their experience and knowledge, and have them hold you accountable.

Take control of your destiny.

Sure, some things are out of your control, but the ball is largely in your hands. What do YOU (not anyone else!) need to do to be able to live what you love? Build a plan, take ownership of it, and execute.

This is where it can start to get uncomfortable because it may require that dreaded 6 letter word – CHANGE. It could mean deciding to move on from your current position or employer. It could mean asking your boss for an international assignment. It could mean going into work an hour earlier so that you can be home for family dinners.

A long-time mentor of mine once told me, “big things don’t happen with timid actions.” What bold actions do you need to take in 2014 to live what you love?

How can managers help their team members live what they love?

  1. Listen. Do you know what your team loves – both personally and professionally? If not, get to know them. Listen to both their verbal and nonverbal cues.
  2. Facilitate opportunities. Even though I’m a firm believer that you need to create your own destiny, it certainly never hurts when someone lends a helping hand. As a leader, what opportunities can you create for your team to help them live what they love? Maybe you can connect them to people or other resources they might not be aware of. Or maybe you could offer job shadowing, job rotations, or special project assignments.
  3. Ask what you can do to help your team achieve their goals. Let’s say one of your team members has a passion for cycling. How powerful would it be if you said to him, “Jason, I know it’s one of your goals this year to ride more (you know this because you did #1!). What can I do to help you achieve this goal?”
  4. Be flexible and open-minded. If you do #3, be prepared for the response. Jason might ask to arrive later in the mornings once the sun comes up so that he can ride his bike to work. He might ask if you would support his request to the facilities team to add a bike rack to the parking lot. Being flexible and open-minded to your team’s needs is a way to help them live the lives they love.

Don’t Forget About Mindsets

MarleyLastly, don’t forget these wise words from Barb Marley,

Love the life you live. Live the life you love.

The first sentence is very important. Not only could you strive to fill your time with the things you love; it’s equally important to develop a positive mindset to love the life you’re living…even if you’re not doing what you love all the time. Let’s face it, it’s impossible to spend 100% of our time doing things we love (I don’t care much for mopping floors – you?). If you adopt an optimistic mindset though, it’s amazing what you might find yourself loving.

Live what you love photo credit: nettsu via photopin cc
Bob Marley photo credit: murdelta via photopin cc

3 R’s for Managing Today’s Workforce

How has the role of a manager changed?

The role of a manger in today’s world is far different than what it used to be even just a decade ago. It’s no longer about assigning tasks, tracking attendance, and delivering a top-down authoritative style to get your team to produce results.  This transformation is largely due to the type of workforce we have seen emerge in the second decade of the 21st century. Today’s workforce

  • seeks meaning in their work – it’s about more than a paycheck.
  • wants to be involved in decision making. They don’t like hierarchical layers, so come on out of that stuffy board room.
  • interacts more and more naturally every day in a social and collaborative online environment.
  • will “follow” you not because of a title, but rather because you are trusted, respected, and communicate a compelling vision.
  • is fairly capable of “managing” themselves, in the traditional sense of the word (and prefers that autonomy).
  • is smart and driven.

So, where does that leave managers? Well, in a very critical role actually. Just as the workforce has evolved, the competencies of organizational managers and leaders have evolved as well. Take the following list for example…a decade ago, we didn’t hear much about the following terms in a business context:

  • Emotional intelligence
  • Employee engagement
  • Globalization
  • Virtual teams
  • Talent management
  • Results-oriented work environments (ROWE)
  • Social enterprise

In today’s world, we need to focus more on the function of management versus the role of a manager. The new(er) primary function of management is to create an environment in which employees thrive, accomplish personal and professional growth objectives, and therefore inherently contribute positive results to an organization’s bottom line.  In short, the function of management is to drive individual and team performance, which drives organizational performance. You do this by putting on your coach, counselor (and sometime psychologist!) hats.

Focus on the 3 R’s

Time to put your coach hat on! Any runners out there?  I’m an avid runner; it’s my Zen and just about the only thing in my life that keeps me sane. It has recently become very clear to me that the 3 R’s I adhere to in my running world translate directly into 3 R’s of effective management for today’s workforce. So, here they are…

Take time to REFLECT.

Reflect

As I prepared for my long run this past weekend, I reflected on the following: How did last week’s run go – Mileage? Elevation? Time of day? Traffic? Ankle brace? Pre/Post nutrition?

You will similarly want to reflect with your team on past performance, and for two main reasons:

1. To learn from the past – Identify what went well so you can repeat it and what didn’t go so well so you don’t make the same mistake twice. Don’t just look at individual roles and departments, but look more broadly across the entire organization to learn from other teams as well.

2. To build team spirit – Why does it feel so good to gather with friends and family over the holidays and share old stories, or REFLECT on times gone by? Because you’re creating shared meaning through storytelling, building camaraderie, and inadvertently solidifying the strength in your relationships with one another.

Make sure your team REFUELs.

Refuel

When I run long distances, I strap a water bottle around my waist and take a sip every mile or so. In addition, I’ll eat a GU pack every 5 or 6 miles.

Keep your eyes and ears open, and be aware of when your employees need “refueling”…whether it be something quick in short intervals (the water sips each mile) or something a bit more substantial (the GU pack). Encourage them to refuel by creating an environment that makes this possible. Below are a few things they might need:

  • A day at home after travel
  • A walk outside during that rough 3:00 hour
  • An early Friday Happy Hour and some social time with colleagues
  • A new environment – maybe they’d like to take their laptop to a coffee shop for the rest of the day. Sometimes all we need to refuel is a change of scenery.
  • A quick trip to the gym
  • A vacation completely unplugged – don’t bother them and work with them in advance to put a plan in place to cover everything while they’re gone
  • Sleep! A late start in the morning is very valuable every now and then.
  • Sabbatical – sometimes a longer-term refueling is needed.

It’s important to Model the Way and demonstrate that their leader refuels too. This makes it acceptable. One of the first things you can do to help promote an environment that allows people to refuel is to visibly show your team when YOU refuel. Try some of the things above yourself, and your team will naturally follow.

REWARD your team for their achievements.

Rewards

For those of you who know me well, you know about my obsession with ice cream. I absolutely eat a Dairy Queen blizzard, Sonic Blast, or UDF hot fudge sundae the night of every long run. Why? Because I earned it, and I love it. I look forward to it, and it feels so good when I get it. I even think about it during my long runs (no judging!), and it provides me with motivation to keep going.

Rewards in the workplace should work the same way. Whether it’s through something as small as a handwritten thank-you note, or something as complex and formal as compensation (and everything in between), make sure you are providing rewards and recognition in a timely manner when you observe behaviors that you would like to see continue.

Check out another Core Chat post for an easy-read on 3 Ways to Make Recognition Meaningful.

It’s not easy, but there’s a starting point for everything

All of this talk about the three R’s is a little more complicated than assigning tasks and tracking attendance. Your role as a manager in the 21st century is no easy feat. You’re dealing with human psychology and trying to motivate certain behaviors so that your organization will see repeat performances week after week, month after month, and year after year.

One place to start as you further develop yourself as a manger is to Reflect with your team on the past, Refuel your team for the work that lies ahead, and Reward positive behaviors all along the way.

I’d love to hear the strategies you use to accomplish the 3 R’s, so please share by commenting below!

Photo credit (Blizzard): Imagine24 via photopin cc

Back to School: Motivating the “Student” Spirit

Employee MotivationWhen we were young, our teachers rewarded us with things like pizza parties, “You’re Super!” stickers, and the privilege of lining up first for recess. Our friends motivated us by attending our theatrical performances and yelling our name from the audience or writing on our car windows with shaving cream the night before a big game.

We’re not in grade school anymore, but our need for motivation hasn’t vanished. According to Bill Hewlett, co-founder of Hewlett Packard, “Men and women want to do a good job, a creative job, and if they are provided the proper environment, they will do so.”

As a manager, how can I create a motivating environment?

Gone are the days of old-school management. It’s an individual choice to perform or not— it can’t be a directive. You need to create that environment Bill Hewlett referenced. How, you ask?

  • Catch your employees doing things right. Pop over to their desk and interrupt them to give thanks or say job well done…versus with a “fire” that needs to be put out.
  • Hand over the wheel. Empowerment builds excitement! 92% of employees want to be asked for their opinions or ideas, and 89% want to be involved in decision-making.
  • Don’t forget about pizza parties and stickers! The same simple and cost-effective forms of motivation work for adults too. Need ideas? Purchase the book 1501 Ways to Reward Employees by Bob Nelson, PhD.

As an individual contributor, how can I create a motivating environment?

Think you’re off the hook because you don’t manage people—wrong! We’re all responsible for creating a motivational environment, so do your part by:

  • Igniting energy in others. Raise your own energy level while at work – it will be contagious.
  • Sending along kudos.  Recognize individuals or teams for something awesome they’ve done. You can do this by sending an email to their supervisor, calling attention to them in a team meeting, or submitting a note to the employee newsletter or intranet editorial team.
  • Being nice and exuding positivity. Back to the basics on this one—please, thank-you, good morning, etc. People want to work with colleagues they get along with and will be motivated to work constructively with you if you’re pleasant.

I hope these “back-to-school” tips are a good reminder to us working adults that motivation drives performance!

photo credit: CanadianAEh via photopin cc

When “Me, Me, Me” is Oh So Good

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I stopped at a Fairfield Inn just outside of Knoxville, TN with my family on our way down to Florida last week for summer vacation. We were in the breakfast area looking for a pitcher of water, but with no luck. I stopped a hotel associate and asked where I could find some. Her response was,

Sure, no problem – I have some in my gym right over there and have the door propped open for you.

Later that day somewhere in the Carolinas on HWY 26, I came across the following post while browsing my Facebook feed:

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What do the hotel associate’s response and FB post have in common? Ownership.

 

Isn’t it funny how well you take care of things when they’re yours?

Ownership

 

BreakfastThat hotel associate in Tennessee was running a stellar show for breakfast – coffee always hot and filled, tables wiped down, service with a smile…she owned the place…and my were her customers happy! Leadership at that establishment definitely knows a thing or two about empowerment.

My FB friend was putting a little glitz and glam into her home…spent her hard-earned resources doing it…and was excited about it. Quite a bit different than how some people treat rental property.

Do you want your employees renting or owning their responsibilities at work?

I think it’s safe to say we all want our team members to be excited about their work and to take pride in it just as in the two examples above.

Below are 4 ways to create a culture of empowerment amongst your team so that they will own their to-do list and contribute successful results to the business:

1. Involve the individuals themselves in developing the What’s and How’s.

What is your team working on and how are they going about accomplishing it? Empowerment is direction without the details. Share the vision, then work with them collaboratively to both create and execute the roadmap.

Just as the homeowner above picked out new granite and countertops, have your employees “pick out” what they want a project, sales presentation, or process to look like. Don’t just have them rent your ways of doing things.

2. Apply a “walk before you run” approach.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANot every team member is going to be comfortable with a culture of empowerment. They are all likely at different stages of their career and have had varying experiences that have shaped their levels of confidence. Recognize this and tailor your approach to empower each one appropriately.

  • Toddlers – They are curious but have a lot of questions and still look back for reassurance. You’ll have to be a little more hands-on, but it will pay off in the long run.
  • Adolescents – They want to be on their own and typically have the confidence, but still need resources and guidance.  Mentoring employees at this stage in their career is very important. Stay connected through check points.
  • Adults – You may have more senior level employees on your team who have been around the block a time or two. Keep them challenged by asking them to run with a project that is a bit out of their comfort zone or is new for the company. Harness their rich knowledge by encouraging them to serve as informal mentors to others on the team.

3. Be okay with – no, encourage – mistakes.

Tell your team to make mistakes. Promote a culture of learning alongside your culture of empowerment. The two go hand-in-hand. Use the mistakes as teachable moments to help your team grow.

4. Still be a team.

Everything is better when created in partnership with others. Although each team member will flourish when given ownership of certain tasks, you need to foster a collaborative team environment where everyone is willing and able to lend a hand. My FB friend would have never enjoyed her new granite and cabinets if it weren’t for manufacturers and contractors. Likewise, your team needs to rely on the strengths of those around them to add value to whatever it is they’re working on.

In what other ways have you developed a culture of empowerment? Please share!

photo credit (Woman): Camdiluv ♥ via photopin cc

photo credit (Food) : Kevin_Morris via photopin cc

photo credit (Hands): Maja_Larsson via photopin cc

Leadercast Take 2: The Trust Formula

TrustIn line with the Simply Lead theme to this year’s Leadercast event, let me continue this series by starting this post with a simple formula:

2 is better than 1 because 2 does it better than 1. Without trust, you only have 1.

One of the speakers at Leadercast was Mike Krzyzewsk – better known as “Coach K” – who has been the head coach of Duke University’s men’s basketball program since 1980. Coach K shared the above statement when talking about his experience coaching Team USA’s Olympic Basketball team, whom he led to gold medal victories in both the Beijing and London summer games.

London Olympics Basketball Men[Memes] LeBron James Memes Team USA Basketball Olympics2008 USA Men's Olympic Basketball

As you can imagine, Coach K had some “big” personalities to lead – Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, and Carmelo Anthony to name a few. The best-of-the-best from all across the United States, with each potentially having their own personal agenda.

Trust was a critical factor to their success – trust in Coach K to lead well and trust in each other to give their best on the court so that the entire team, and country, would claim the Gold. Without trust, they would not have been able to benefit from their collective strengths and contributions, as demonstrated by the simple Trust Formula infographic below.

How Can You Build Trust?

As a leader, what can you do to gain the trust of your team? Here are a few simple actions you can take to get started:

1.  Make eye contact and actively listen to your team members. Just these two things alone with go a long way.

2.  Always tell the truth, expect the truth, and stay true to your word. The trust lost after just one broken promise or little white lie could take months or even years to rebuild.

3.  Be transparent. Share information consistently, openly and in a timely manner, even if you can’t expose every last detail.

4.  Spend time in the trenches. Think Undercover Boss for this one. Frontline employees sometimes feel disconnected from the bigger picture, yet they are usually your subject matter experts and have incredibly valuable insights into your customers and solutions. Acknowledge and involve them as trusted partners to the organization’s success.

5.  Empower your team members. Demonstrate the trust you have in them to take an idea and run with it, and they will likely reciprocate that same level of trust back to you. No one likes being micro-managed.

6.  Give the credit to the team. Never take sole credit for something that went well – it’s never the result of just one person. Give credit where credit is due. Read the Core Chat post on 3 Ways to Make Recognition Meaningful.

How do you build trust amongst your team? Please share your thoughts and ideas below. Because after all,

We’re not a team because we work together. We’re a team because we trust each other ~ via @ValaAfshar #tchat

Be sure to subscribe to Core Chat and continue to follow the Leadercast series as I recap some of the key take-aways from this inspirational event!

Cliff’s Notes from Leadercast: 5 Ways to Simply Lead

This post comes fresh off the heels of Leadercast 2013, which brought together 120,000 people in 750 “host” sites in 25 countries around the world for a leadership boot camp of sorts. The impressive speaker line-up included world-renowned executive coaches, sports icons, political officials, and best-selling authors, such as John C. Maxwell, Condoleezza Rice, and Jack Welch.

Did you happen to miss out? No worries – I will be running a series on Core Chat that will take a deeper dive into some of the concepts from the event. I’d love for you to subscribe, follow along, and contribute. If you did attend, please share your thoughts throughout the series as well. Let’s not let the dialogue die just because May 10th is over – let’s keep this critical conversation going!

leadercast

The theme of this year’s event was Simply Lead. In the spirit of simplicity, this first post is the Cliff’s Notes version of Leadercast 2013. If you don’t continue to follow this series, at a very minimum you can start to Simply Lead just by reading and acting on the next 345 words – I have packaged up 7 hours of learning, 9 speakers’ insights, and 15 pages of notes into 5 key takeaways from the event.

Ready…set…lead!

Wordle: Influence

1. Understand that leadership is not a role or title. “Leadership is influence. Nothing more, nothing less.” ~ John C. Maxwell

Everyone reading this post has the opportunity to lead, regardless of your age, gender, occupation, or position within an organization.  How can you lead without the title? Check out the recent Harvard Business Review post on this topic here.

2. Intentionally add value to others every day.

Another great reminder from @JohnCMaxwell. Leadership is not about you.  Leaders spend their energy and resources putting their followers in positions to succeed. During Jack Welch’s tenure as CEO at GE, capital rose by $387 billion. What did his day-to-day look like? He spent 70% of his time building and developing his team…and his team took it from there.

You don’t need a team in the literal sense – add value to colleagues, clients, neighbors, family, and a “followership” will naturally occur.

medium_27045044633. Stretch yourself and those around you.

Okay, I need you to get a little physical for this one. Lieutenant Commander and Navy Seal Rorke Denver  led us through this exercise at Leadercast (don’t worry – it’s not painful):

  • Lift your arms up.
  • No really – do it.
  • Still waiting…
  • Ok, thank you.
  • Now relax your shoulders and then reach back up as high as you can.
  • Now stretch them just 1-inch higher.

Give one more inch in everything you do. Ask for opportunities.  Act on opportunities. Do things that are uncomfortable and challenging. Push yourself to GROW, and bring others along for the ride!

medium_69335229144. Get appropriately engaged.

“With growth comes complexity, and complexity is the enemy of clarity.” ~ Andy Stanley

You can’t Lead Simply without staying laser focused on what matters most and prioritizing your time appropriately. You don’t need more time, you need greater focus. As mentioned at Leadercast – Mother Theresa only had 24 hours – just sayin’.

5. Stop looking for a leader to solve a problem. Be the leader who solves the problem.

The next time you’re frantically looking around for someone to solve a problem for you, stop and ask yourself, “how would I solve this problem?” – and then go out and do it!

Stay tuned over the next few weeks as we take a deeper dive into some of these concepts and a few others from Leadercast 2013. If you attended the event, are there any other key takeaways on your Top 5 list?

Click here to read part 2 of the Leadercast series: The Trust Formula.

Click here to read part 3 of the Leadercast series: Goodbye Old Friend, It’s Been Real.

photo credit (Navy Seals): Rennett Stowe via photopin cc

photo credit (clock): Tord Mattsson via photopin cc